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FAQ QuestionWhat is laminate flooring and how is it made?
FAQ Answer

Laminate flooring gives the appearance of hardwood, ceramic tile, stone or even brick without using any of those products. Laminate floors are constructed of several layers of different materials that are pressed together under a very high pressure making it an extremely durable floor. These layers generally consist of a moisture barrier on the bottom, with a layer of high density fiberboard (HDF) laid on top of that. The next layer is what determines the appearance. It is a very high resolution image of the type of floor it is made to resemble topped by very durable, clear layer of resin-coated cellulose.

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FAQ QuestionWhere did laminate flooring originate?
FAQ Answer
Laminate floors originated in Europe in 1977. They weren't introduced to the US and Canada until 1994, but they have become very popular since then.
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FAQ QuestionWhat are the advantages of laminate flooring?
FAQ Answer

Laminate floors offer the look of expensive flooring materials at a fraction of the cost. Laminate flooring is easy for the Do-It-Yourselfer to install. It can be installed below, above, or on grade. The construction method makes it extremely durable and resistant to scratching and fading.

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FAQ QuestionWhat are the disadvantages of laminate flooring?
FAQ Answer

As with any floor, it is possible to scratch or damage a laminate floor. Laminate flooring may swell or warp under pooling liquids or in high levels of humidity. And unfortunately, damaged laminate floors cannot be sanded or re-finished, they can only be replaced.

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FAQ QuestionWho is laminate flooring best for?
FAQ Answer
Laminate flooring is best for someone looking for a durable, versatile, and cost-effective floor. Laminate floors are a good choice for a self installer as most manufacturers use a snap together glue-less method.
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FAQ QuestionHow does laminate flooring differ from hardwood flooring?
FAQ Answer
Laminate floors are cheaper than most hardwood flooring and much easier to install. Laminate's construction makes it extremely durable and often more resistant to scratching and fading than hardwood, although it can't be refinished like hardwood can. Solid hardwood flooring should not be installed below grade due to fluctuations in moisture levels, while laminate floors can be installed below, above, or on grade. The benefits of laminate floors are making them an increasingly popular product.
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FAQ QuestionWhat is the average lifetime of a laminate floor?
FAQ Answer
Most manufacturers estimate the lifetime of a laminate floor to be between 10-30 years, depending on factors such as traffic volume and proper care and maintenance.
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FAQ QuestionIs there any difference between brown core and green core laminate flooring?
FAQ Answer
No, the green core is simply a result of a coloring agent added to the adhesive. In years past there was a perception that green core meant moisture resistant or moisture proof, but this is no longer the case.
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FAQ QuestionGenerally, how often do laminate flooring wood grain patterns repeat?
FAQ Answer
Most manufacturers will repeat their pattern every 8 to 20 planks. Planks with characteristics like knots might seem to repeat more often, but they do not.
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FAQ QuestionIs laminate flooring considered a floating floor?
FAQ Answer

Laminate flooring is available in two different installation methods: glueless floating and glued floating. Both types are floated above the subfloor with a click and lock system; the difference is glued floating requires adhesive between the floor planks while glueless does not.

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FAQ QuestionWhat does HDF stand for and what is it constructed of?
FAQ Answer
HDF stands for High Density Fiberboard. It is a very high-density fiber panel that is resistant to moisture. It is constructed of wood particles that are ground into a pulp with melamine-urea-formaldehyde resin added. This pulp is dried and pressed into panels under very high pressure.
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FAQ QuestionWhat are laminate flooring AC ratings and what ratings are recommend for each environment?
FAQ Answer

AC ratings are a standardized measure used by The Association of European Producers of Laminate Flooring (ELPF). The rating is based on abrasion resistance, impact resistance, resistance to staining and cigarette burns, and thickness swelling along edges on a scale of 1-5.

  • AC1 is the least durable and is suitable for residential areas that have low traffic, like bedrooms or basements.
  • AC2 is slightly more durable and is suitable for residential areas that have low to moderate traffic, like living rooms and dining rooms.
  • AC3 has moderate durability and is suitable for both residential and commercial areas. It can be used in a variety of areas such as small offices, lightly-trafficked commercial locations, residential kitchens, etc.
  • AC4 has above average durability and is also suitable for both residential and commercial areas. It can be used in higher traffic commercial areas such as busier offices and restaurants.
  • AC5 is the most durable, and is recommended for very high traffic commercial areas like department stores and public buildings.
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