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FAQ QuestionWhere can stone flooring be installed?
FAQ Answer

It depends on the type of stone being installed. Most stone flooring can be installed outdoors or indoors in residential or commercial areas, as long as they are protected from pooling liquids and acidic substances. You may need a moisture barrier in certain situations. Check with your local supplier to find what type of stone flooring will work best in the area you want to install.

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FAQ QuestionHow are stone floor tiles usually installed?
FAQ Answer
Stone floor tiles are most commonly glued to the subfloor. Spaces left between tiles are filled with grout. Most floors are buffed to a polished, matte, or textured look, then sealed.
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FAQ QuestionWhy should stone flooring be sealed and how is it done?
FAQ Answer
Stone is a very porous material which tends to hold liquid and debris. A sealer is used to keep these pores clogged and sealed so that liquid and debris stays on the surface and does not sink into the stone. A sealer will help your stone flooring keep its original beauty and protect it from staining.
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FAQ QuestionHow do you cut stone floor tile?
FAQ Answer
Stone floor tiles are cut with a water saw and then sanded and polished on the edges.
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FAQ QuestionIs stone flooring recommended for self installation?
FAQ Answer
Usually, no. Unless you are a seasoned self-installer, stone installation should be left to a professional. It is an extremely heavy type of flooring that needs to be handled with precision and care. It also takes special tools to cut and install stone flooring.
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FAQ QuestionWhat are the differences and similarities between stone and ceramic tile?
FAQ Answer
Both are hard surfaces that are cold to the touch and unforgiving on dropped objects. There are many differences, however. Natural stone will vary in color and can have unique flaws, while ceramic tile is more consistent and uniform. Stone is also more difficult to maintain as periodic deep-cleaning and sealing needs to be done. Stone tends to absorb moisture or "breathe," making it prone to stains from many acidic foods such as ketchup, orange juice, vinegar, and others. Stone flooring is generally expected to be a harder material than ceramic, although in some situations this is not true. For example, in freezing conditions some types of slate can literally "explode". However, there are also certain ceramics that are not suitable for outdoor use in some climates. Stone is usually more expensive but also more luxurious-looking.
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