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cork and high moisture area
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robmason
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Joined: December 2008
Posts: 5
Location:
Robinsdale, MN
Posted: December 15, 2008 12:22 PM

Hi,

   
robmason
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Joined: December 2008
Posts: 5
Location:
Robinsdale, MN
Posted: December 15, 2008 12:24 PM

RE: cork and high moisture area
sorry, I seem to have become trigger happy. Please excuse the multiple entries. :(
MrsKosha
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Posted: December 15, 2008 12:33 PM

RE: cork and high moisture area
No problem Rob.  I can delete the multiple entries.  Did you have a questions about cork in high moisture areas though?
robmason
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Joined: December 2008
Posts: 5
Location:
Robinsdale, MN
Posted: December 15, 2008 12:48 PM

RE: cork and high moisture area
MrsKosha,

Thanks for the help. Yea, I do have a question.

Our house had carpeting throughout, when we moved in. This last year, we removed most of the carpeting after we found hardwood beneath. The dining room, which was added later, does not have hardwood. It only has two layers of fiberboard. The fiberboard, when we removed the carpeting, has thin gluey blue layer from the carpet padding.

Some friends gave us some leftover Cork tiles. They are a foot square and are thin, only maybe 3/4'' thick. I believe they are intended for gluing.

Our dining room has two doors leading into it; both are in the same corner of the room. One leads from the garage and the other from outdoors. In addition, the diningroom also has two sliding glass doors to the deck.

I am concerned about moisture warping the tiles if we choose to use them. Previously, there was linoleum tile where the doors are.

Our "plan" has been to put in new linoleum, or tiles for a threshhold beneath the doors. The rest of the dining room would be these glued down tiles.

My wife and I really like the idea of cork flooring.

Has anyone had found any issues, or see any pitfalls with using cork flooring around an entry way? Also, we live in Minnesota, where snow gets tracked in, etc.

THANKS! for any assistance offered.
MrsKosha
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Posted: December 15, 2008 6:33 PM

RE: cork and high moisture area
Hi Rob,

First off, cork is one of my favorite types of flooring, and when you buy the right cork, and install it correctly, it can be a very durable type of flooring.  Unfortunately, there are less quality cork floors out there, that I would not say the same for.  I have seen cork floors as thin as 1/4", so 3/4" really isn't that thin. Do you know if they are homogenos or veneer?  Here is a link that can help you determine this www.findanyfloor.com/BuyingGuides/....  The reason I ask is that homogenous cork floors can be sanded and refinished if they do get damaged where veneered ones cannot. 

In my opinion, as long as you clean up water and mud from shoes quickly and use some rugs safe for cork flooring at your doors, you would probably be okay installing cork in the entire room rather than doing a section of tile or linoleum in front of the doors.  Either either way should be fine though.  Keep in mind that if you do install tile or linoleum at the doors, you will need t-molding to transition between the two pieces which can add to the overall cost of your project. Also, if the two types of floors are not the same height, it may look a little funny.

I recommend that you check out this link to get a general idea of where cork is and is not suitable. www.findanyfloor.com/BuyingGuides/...

As far as the subfloor goes, you don't want to try to glue down the cork floors over the exisiting glue residue.  I recommend either lying new plywood over the old fiberboard or tearing it up and then lying down plywood. 

You may be able to seal the cork tiles to help add to their moisture resistance, but this may void the manufacturer's warranty.  In your case, since you got the tiles from some friends, you might not be too concerned with warranties. Before you make a decision, I would personally put that cork to the test.  Tile a tile and see what it takes to scratch, stain, etc.

 

Hope that helps and please let me know if you need any more specific info!

 

Stacey

 
robmason
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Joined: December 2008
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Location:
Robinsdale, MN
Posted: December 16, 2008 11:56 AM

RE: cork and high moisture area
Stacy,

     That's wonderfully helpful information. Thanks!

Rob

 
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